Water Supply Dwindling: Drought Strikes Connecticut

drought
Conn. residents are asked to reduce water demand by 10 percent.
(Image courtesy of the U.S. Drought Monitor.)

Monday, November 7, 2016 (Issue #2)
by Austin Rick, Environment Editor

.   .   .

Currently, Connecticut is facing a drought, according to the United States Drought Monitor. In fact, the monitor states some are dealing with a D2-D4 level drought, which means they are in the middle of a severely dry season. What could have caused a drought like this?

According to WNPR News, dry weather is to blame. “In Connecticut, the entire state is either abnormally dry or experiencing moderate drought, with the driest parts in Hartford County, New Haven County, and most of Litchfield County.” As level of awareness piqued, mandatory action has been called upon.

As part of their drought advisory, a representative for CT.gov stated “all Connecticut residents and businesses are requested to voluntarily reduce water demand by 10 percent; reductions in lawn watering are encouraged as the best way to meet conservation goals.” The site claims “precipitation across Connecticut has been down as much as six inches over the last 90 days.” As of Sept. 14, the drought advisory is still in effect, as consequences have taken hold.

“In Connecticut, the entire state is either abnormally dry or experiencing moderate drought, with the driest parts in Hartford County, New Haven County, and most of Litchfield County.”
—WNPR

CT.gov states, “the criteria for precipitation has not been triggered,” meaning that the amount of rainfall needed to take Connecticut out of the drought has not been met. Additionally, “groundwater has been three consecutive months below normal,” and “stream flow has been below normal in two of the past three months.”

The water supply is dwindling, and people should be careful. “Crops have been abnormally dry,” posing a threat when it comes to fire; the fire danger is reportedly “moderate or above average.” WNPR writes the “drought can also cause a wildfire risk and make it a little harder to grow food.”

Unfortunately, only time will tell when Connecticut will receive enough rain to break through the drought cycle. However, Connecticut residents can do their share by cutting back on consumption of water.

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